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Susquehanna Life

By The Book [Summer 2019]

Jun 06, 2019 11:30AM

By The Book



Pennsylvania’s Preserved Lands

By Jeffrey F. Williams

$29.99, Schiffer Publishing

Pennsylvania’s Preserved Lands uses beautiful photography and extensive research to describe the best and most important preserved natural areas in Pennsylvania. Punctuated with interesting facts and definitions and abbreviations, the book serves as a guide to access and recreation to important sites, including old-growth forests, wildflower preserves, waterfalls, natural beaches, deep canyons, wildlife, wetlands, glacial bogs and wilderness areas.



When Kids Rule the School

By Jim Rietmulder

$19.99, New Society Publishers

Education is ripe for democratic disruption, Rietmulder suggests. Students in most schools are denied fundamental social ideals such as personal freedom, public government, rule of law and free enterprise. The book is reported to be the first comprehensive guide to democratic schooling, where kids practice life in a self-governed society. Rietmulder is one of the four founders of Harrisburg’s The Circle School, where children ages 4 to 18 practice freedom and responsibility in a scaled-down version of the larger world.



The Restorers

By Brook Lenker

$14.99, Year of the Book Press

Two years after divorce, Reily Watters lacks direction. A 444-mile canoe and kayak expedition on the Susquehanna River offers diversion he can’t pass up. But when a real estate development threatens the river, Reily and his friends must decide whether to take action, or just keep paddling. Set in 2004, The Restorers blends the brash wildness of Jack Kerouac with the ecojustice of Carl Hiaasen and the riverine peace painted by Mark Twain.




Babel of the Atlantic

Edited by Bethany Wiggin

$99.95, Penn State Press

Despite shifting trends in the study of Oceanic Atlantic history, the colonial Atlantic world as it is described by historians today continues to be a largely English-only space; even when other language communities are examined, they, too, are considered to be monolingual and discrete. Babel of the Atlantic pushes back against this monolingual fallacy by documenting multilingualism, translation and fluid movement across linguistic borders.





To view our picks from the previous issue, click here.

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