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Susquehanna Life's 2018 Outdoor Recreation Guide

Jun 01, 2018 12:11PM

Back on the Ball

For a lifelong soccer player, ACL reconstruction offers a second chance on the field.

John Furia, MD, is a member of the team of experts at SUN Orthopaedics of Evangelical.

When Nick Yevics heard a popping sound in his right knee during a soccer collision in December 2016, he hoped the injury wasn’t as serious as he feared. Excited to be on the field again after a 15-year gap, the lifelong soccer aficionado had recently joined an adult recreation league and looked forward to his weekly games. But brief, intense pain in Yevics’ knee gave way to lasting instability and the realization that the 37-year-old high school math teacher had badly injured his ACL, or anterior cruciate ligament.

“I did play a couple more games wearing a light knee brace, but a few weeks later I planted my leg trying to make a turn, and it hurt again like crazy. It swelled up and I could barely walk,” Yevics recalls. “I got an MRI at my primary care doctor’s office and they told me [my ACL] was torn.”

The Watsontown resident was referred to orthopaedic surgeon John Furia, MD, of SUN Orthopaedics of Evangelical. Confirming the diagnosis, Dr. Furia told Yevics that ACL reconstruction surgery was his best option for restoring his abilities on the field. The ACL, one of the four main ligaments in the knee, is vital for normal knee movement and stability, enabling the twisting and pivoting that soccer and many other sports demand.

Yevics is one of about 200,000 Americans who tear their ACL each year, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. About half undergo ACL reconstruction surgery, often because resuming their sports or occupations requires frequent knee rotations or heavy manual labor.

“It was clear to me that Nick wanted to get back to what he was doing before being injured,” Dr. Furia says. “ACL surgery has been a game-changer for many people. It’s been responsible for keeping younger and even a bit older individuals in competitive sports that require twisting and turning.”

MINIMALLY INVASIVE

Nick Yevics is back on the field after a successful ACL reconstruction surgery.

In early March, Dr. Furia reconstructed Yevics’ ACL in a minimally invasive, hour-long surgery at Evangelical Community Hospital. The procedure was performed arthroscopically, requiring only a few tiny incisions around the knee instead of a long one. Dr. Furia inserted a camera into one of the surgical cuts to view the knee’s internal structures on a video monitor in the operating room. Additional surgical tools were inserted through the other small cuts, and Yevics’ torn ligament was removed.

In ACL reconstruction, the replacement tendon is taken from either a patient’s own body—using the kneecap or hamstring tendon—or from a donor cadaver. After leaving the choice up to Yevics, Dr. Furia used a donor ACL for his surgery, which was threaded through tunnels drilled through bones in the knee and held in place with surgical screws.

“Donor tissue is helpful in someone a little bit older because you don’t rob Peter to pay Paul,” Dr. Furia explains. “There are fewer surgical complications and it hurts less, which facilitates rehabilitation. And because we don’t heal as fast as we get older, it essentially speeds recovery.”

QUICK RECOVERY

Yevics’ recovery was blissfully straightforward. After a short period using crutches and a knee brace, he soon went back to his teaching job and moving about without pain. By mid-June, after 20 sessions of physical therapy, Yevics was also back to running and other exercise, expecting to be cleared for soccer competition in time for the fall/winter season.
Yevics says, “I think my surgery has been a huge success. I feel great.”
 

HOW CAN YOU TELL IT’S YOUR ACL?

A “popping” sound in the knee is one of the telltale signs of a torn ACL, or anterior cruciate ligament. The common knee injury often happens while participating in sports requiring rapid changes in direction or landing from a jump, such as football, skiing, and soccer.

How else can you tell your ACL is injured? According to John Furia, MD, of SUN Orthopaedics of Evangelical, typical signs include:

  • Knee pain that doesn’t last long
  • A knee feels “sloppy” or unstable
  • A “slipping” sensation in the knee when you stop or turn
  • An inability to play sports
  • Avoiding use of the affected knee in favor of the other side
 

THE NEXT STEP 

At Sun Orthopaedic of Evangelical, we explore every treatment option – from simple braces to the most advanced surgical techniques. And, we support you through the entire healing process, making sure you’re back to being a warrior every practice, every game.

Call 1-800-598-5096 or visit www.evanhospital.com/sportsmedicine
 
 

Fitness Guide

It’s summertime, and the temperature is just right for getting outdoors! Work off some calories, breathe in some fresh air, drink in some Vitamin D-boosting sunshine! Here are some ideas, sponsored by Sun Orthopaedic at Evangelical, to get you started. 

June 1Wildlife Watchers on the Water Guided Kayak Program, 5-6:30 p.m., Codorus State Park, Hanover. Preregistration is required. (717) 637-2816

June 1Wildlife Night Hike/Walk/Bird and Wildlife Viewing,  (814) 676-5915.

June 2Friends of Cook Forest Series: Milkweed for Monarchs Planting Event and Hike/WalkCook Forest State Park, Clarington, 8 to 10 a.m. 

June 3Searchin’ for Sally, hiking/walking/birding/wildlife viewing, Prince Gallitzin State Park, 9:30 -10:30 a.m.

June 3Trek to Tall TreesOhiopyle State Park, 12-1:30 p.m. (724) 329-8591

June 6Wildlife Watchers on the Water Guided Kayak Program, Codorus State Park, 5-6:30 p.m. (717) 637-2816

June 8Glacier Ridge Trail HikeMoraine State Park, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. http://events.dcnr.pa.gov/event/glacier_ridge_trail_hike#.WwRH_aQvx6s

June 8, Fishing 101, French Creek State Park, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Ages 10 & up.

June 9, National Get Outdoors Day Hikes in PA

Lake Towhee Park 
Applebachsville, Pennsylvania 

Silver Lake Park 
Bristol Township, Pennsylvania 

Tinicum Park 
Erwinna, Pennsylvania 

Playwicki Park 
Langhorne, Pennsylvania 

Core Creek Park 
Middleton Township, Pennsylvania 

Peace Valley Park 
New Britain Township, Pennsylvania 

Tohickon Valley Park 
Point Pleasant, Pennsylvania 

Ringing Rocks Park 
Upper Black Eddy, Pennsylvania 
 
June 9Mindfulness HikeLancaster County Central Park, Garden of Five Senses, 9-10 a.m. (717) 299-8215

June 9, Women’s Intro to Fly Fishing, Cherry Valley National Wildlife Refuge, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. (570) 477-2206

June 9, Kayaking Basics, Black Moshannon State Park, 11 a.m.-12 noon, (814) 342-5960

June 12, Tuesday Trails, Jacobsburg Environmental Education Center, 4:30-6 p.m. (610) 746-2801

June 14, Flag Day Veterans Paddle, Beltzville State Park, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. (610) 377-0045

June 15, Hiking Series 3, Nescopeck State Park, 9-11:30 a.m., 4 miles, (570) 403-2006

June 15 & July 11, Native Night Sky Star-Telling, Lancaster County Central Park, Pavilion 1, 8:30-9:30 p.m. (717) 952-055

June 16, PA Wilds Child Outdoors Day, ages 7-16, Black Moshannon State Park, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. $25, (814) 342-5960

June 16Fat Tire Challenger & Camp, Beartown Rocks Trail Race, Clear Creek State Park, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Family-friendly. http://www.fattirechallenge.com/

June 16 & July 28, Edible Camp: Medicinal Plants Walk, Prince Gallitzin State Park, 10 a.m.-12 noon, (570) 828-2319

June 16Bicycle Tour Presque Isle State Park, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (814) 806-2511

June 16, Father’s Day Paddle, Sand Island Park, 1-5 p.m. (610) 865-7081

June 16, Binoculars & Butterflies, Bald Eagle State Park, 2-3 p.m. (814) 625-2775

June 17Fly Fishing 101 For EveryoneBerks County Heritage Center, 12-4 p.m. (610) 374-8839

June 21Summer Solstice CelebrationLancaster County Central Park Environmental Center, 6:30-8:30 p.m. (717) 295-2055

June 21, Leave No Trace Hike, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, Boiling Springs, 6-8 p.m. (717) 258-5771

June 21, Summer Solstice Hike, Stateline Woods Preserve, 7-8:30 p.m. (610) 347-0347

June 22, River of the Year Celebration, Pier 87, Plunketts Creek Township, 6-8 p.m. (570) 768-6300

June 23, River of the Year Sojourn, Pier 87, Plunketts Creek Township. www.SplashSeries.org

June 23-25Lehigh River SojournLehigh Gorge State Park. (610) 965-4397 X118

June 23, Family Fishing Program, Lackawanna State Park, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. (570) 477-2206

June 23, Hike to Panther’s Bluff, Rail Trail Simpson Trailhead, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

June 23, Horseshoe Trail Shuttle Hike, 12 miles, moderate. St. Peters Village to Scotts Run Lake. Scott Birchman (484) 280-3034

June 28Full Moon Hike on the TowpathBerks County Heritage Center, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

June 30, Geocache Guided Hike, Blue Marsh Lake, 10 a.m.-12 noon.

June 30-July 1, AT Hike Across PA, 15.6 miles, strenuous. Registration required. Cindy Radich cradich7@verizon.net

July 1Eagle Charge Veteran's RunLock Haven levee Riverwalk. (570) 295-5845 or teamrwb.org

July 7, West Branch Express Paddle, Watsontown to Milton. (570) 524-7692 or paddlehappy.com

July 15, Lewisburg Appetizer Paddle, Milton State Park, West Milton. (570) 524-7692 or paddlehappy.com

July 21Sproul 10KWestern Clinton County Sportsmen's Association Nature and Environmental Center, Hyner. hikerun.com

July 22, Montour Preserve Paddle, Montour Preserve, Danville. (570) 524-7692 or paddlehappy.com

July 27-29, Prowl the Sproul Hiking Weekend, Renovo. (717) 766-9690 or kta-hike.org

July 28 & August 25, McKee’s Adventure, Port Trevorton to Mahantango Access. (570) 524-7692 or paddleHappy.com

August 4, Peace of the Susquehanna Paddle, Montgomery. (570) 524-7692 or PaddleHappy.com 

August 13, Jewel of the West Branch Paddle, Montgomery. Reservations required. (570) 524-7692 or PaddleHappy.com

August 18Ole Bull Midnight Madness Mountain Bike Enduro RaceOle Bull State Park, Cross Fork. (814) 435-5000

August 18, Pocono Pride Rafting, Whitewater Challengers, Weatherly. (800) 443-8554 or whitewaterchallengers.com

August 25, Hyner Half Trail Race, Hyner State Park. hikerun.com

August 31-November 4Corn MazeKohl's Stony Hill Tree Farm, Milton. (570) 437-3442 or kohlsstonyhill.com

For a list of events coming up in the Keystone Trails Association Community, check out their Calendar.

Resources

The following hiking clubs are members of Keystone Trails Association. 

Allegheny Outdoor Club
Allentown Hiking Club
Alpine Club of Williamsport
AMC-Delaware Valley Chapter
Asaph Trail Club
Batona Hiking Club
Berks Community Hiking Club
Blue Mountain Eagle Climbing Club
Butler Outdoor Club
Central Pennsylvania Conservancy
Chester County Trail Club
Cumberland Valley AT Club
Duncannon Appalachian Trail Community
Forest Coalition
Friends of Pine Groves Furnace State Park
Friends of the Wissahickon
Horse-Shoe Trail Conservancy
Lancaster County Conservancy
Lancaster Hiking Club
Lebanon Valley Hiking Club (717.274.5509 -- Sharon Southall)
Mason-Dixon Trail System
Mid State Trail Association
Mountain Club of Maryland
NCTA-Allegheny National Forest Chapter
NCTA-Butler Chapter
NCTA-Clarion Chapter
NCTA-Wampum Chapter
North County Trail Association
Office of Experiential Education
Philadelphia Trail Club
Pocono Outdoor Club
Potomac Appalachian Trail Club
Potomac Appalachian Trail Club-North Chapter
Rachel Carson Trails Conservancy
Responsible Drilling Alliance
Ridge & Valley Outings Club
Sierra Club-Pennsylvania Chapter
Sierra Club-Otzinachson Group
Standing Stone Trail Club
Susquehanna Appalachian Trail Club
Susquehanna Trailers Hiking Club
Susquehannock Trail Club
Trail Adams Area, Inc.
Traditions of America - Silver Spring
Warrior Trail Association, Inc.
Western Pennsylvania Conservancy
WILD Trail Running PA
Wildlands Conservancy
Wilmington Trail Club
Woodbourne Forest & Wildlife Preserve
York Hiking Club

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